How to upgrade your workplace on-boarding for Gen Z employees

A smooth on-boarding process is a must for today’s employees; after all, you want their first days to be inviting, and you want them to understand the ins and outs of your workplace. That’s because you have to make sure your employees are engaged right from the start, given today’s often fickle workforce.

Although most on-boarding best practices work for all generations, there are some specific actions you might want to take to reach your newest Gen Z employees that will capture their attention and underscore the importance of your programs, from benefits to corporate best practices.

Start wooing them from the day you extend the offer.

There’s an unfortunate new trend going on in workplaces, and that’s candidates “ghosting” their new employer. In other words, they’ve gone through all the trouble of interviewing and being hired, and then they just don’t show up on the first day…leaving you with a void and that sinking feeling you have to go back to the drawing board. One way to avoid this is to stay in close touch from the minute you extend the offer, even if there’s a brief lag until their start day. Send them emails with some details on the company culture or to introduce them to team members – anything that will help ensure they feel the love right up until they show up for the first day.

Create “snackable content.”

Gen Z is much maligned for their short attention span, but it’s not entirely their fault. After all the world has sped up, and they have always been used to a quicker pace – their TV shows have even been faster-paced. But the truth is, they are less likely to read through lengthy, fact-packed documents. If you truly want to retain their interest, make the content short and sweet so that they can digest it in short sessions as their time allows.

Focus on culture and transparency.

Gen Z cares about the culture of the workplace they are joining; but it’s not just about Ping-Pong tables and the other trappings that many “cool” workplaces try to assume. They want to be sure that their employer is walking the talk in regards to corporate social responsibility. Companies can help cultivate their loyalty through letting Gen Z employees know from the start what your company does to embrace a culture that is good for the environment, both the working environment they encounter every day and the larger global environment that they care about.

As consulting firm Deloitte explains in its report “Generation Z Enters the Workforce,” “Major consumer brands have found they are better able to build customer loyalty through transparency. For example, Patagonia, an outdoor clothing company, has made its supply chain more transparent via the Footprint Chronicles to demonstrate alignment with its core values of sustainability and environmental stewardship. As employees begin to expect similar norms for their employment brands, the need for transparency will likely only increase.”

Cater to their information on-demand expectation.

Remember that this is the generation that has always had a “computer” in their pocket where they can immediately get the answer to any question. Make sure your intranet is intuitive so that new employees can easily find the answers to questions they have about benefits like disability insurance or retirement plans via a simple search that they can access from any device.

Use images to explain more involved concepts.

Gen Z is very visually oriented, so a picture can be worth even more than 1,000 words. Redeploy your employee training manuals into more visual options, from short videos to infographics that Gen Z workers can understand at a glance. If there is a more involved step in a process, such as how to sign up for benefits, create a short video tutorial. This is the YouTube generation after all.

Try gamification as a strategy.

Turning employee onboarding into a game isn’t just a smart strategy to keep them entertained – it helps with retention, too. And while it works for every generation – most of us tend to zone out when faced with too many words on a page — it’s especially important for Gen Z, who were raised on video games and appreciate being rewarded when they master something. Create quizzes that unlock fun secret games or allow them to level up by answering questions correctly.

As you incorporate multiple generations into the workplace, it’s smart to consider how all your communications strategies can be upgraded. Reaching Gen Z through engaging onboarding is one of the best ways to start off on the right foot.

 




Want to hire Gen Z? Here’s how to find them…and impress them

Just when you thought you finally had this millennial thing down, a new generation is joining the workplace. Yes, welcome to Gen Z, soon coming to a workplace near you, if they’re not already there.

Gen Z (typically described as those born in 1995 and later) is the first generation to grow up as “digital natives,” that is, they don’t remember a time when they couldn’t access everything they need to know on their computer or device. Therefore the way you recruit Gen Z might be very different from other generations.

That’s why companies today are finding success with new modes of communication, reaching out to Gen Z in the language they speak. For example:

  • McDonald’s takes “Snaplications”: Gen Z spends a lot of time on social media, so why not reach them there? in 2017 McDonald’s launched a program that allowed teens to apply via Snapchat. According to Fortune magazine, “Snapchat users may see a 10-second video ad from McDonald’s employees discussing their experience working there. Then users can then swipe up on the app to be redirected to McDonald’s career webpage in the app to apply for openings.”
  • Advertising agency Havas asked intern candidates to text: Corralling Gen Z’s interest in texting and social justice, a global advertising firm asked prospective interns to text ideas about how to change the world for the better.
  • Investment bank Goldman Sachs uses Snapchat geo-filters: Using a feature called “Campus Story,” Goldman Sachs promoted careers at the investment bank with sponsored segments that would show only to users whose phone had been on a specific campus in the past 24 hours.

If you’re still recruiting the “old-fashioned” way, don’t worry: You’re hardly in the minority. But to appeal to Gen Z, you’ll have to make sure that you are communicating the right messages.

  1. Showcase your creative side.

Whereas employers used to implore employees to spend less time on social media, savvy companies realize that it can actually be a recruiting tool. That’s why some companies design their offices with “Instagrammability” in mind.” For example, a Wall Street Journal article reported that several new hires at LinkedIn were impressed with the pictures they saw on Google Images and Instagram, many of which featured interactive wall art as they sought to learn more about the company’s culture.

One of the images is a “Wheel of Dream Jobs” where employees can spin a huge wheel; another is a mural that has a nearby jacket employees can wear that makes them blend in with the wall. “The art the company has installed…is a major help as far as talent retention and getting people excited,” says Cherish Rosas, an environmental graphic design project manager at LinkedIn.

  1. Offer them variety.

You may have heard that fewer teens are taking summer jobs (or, depending on your business may have struggled to hire them yourself). That’s because today, about 70 percent of teens are self-employed, reports Harvard Business Review.

Because of that, Gen Z are used to autonomy and variety and will be attracted to a workplace that offers diversity in job functions. Consider hiring Gen Z with the promise of a job rotation or cross-training opportunities so they feel confident that they will get the mix of activities that will keep the job fresh.

  1. Never forget they are doing their own research.

Employers have to remember the power of social sharing sites like Glassdoor and LinkedIn, where Gen Z employees are going to find out more about the vibe of the company. Whereas companies used to be able to control their online presence through a sparkling website, now they need to do far more to guard their reputation and ensure that the message they are saying about themselves matches what employees believe.

The only way to create that positive image that will attract Gen Z? You have to practice what you preach. The new transparency means that companies have to make sure their actions match their words, in order to gain the best talent.