When you hear the term ‘underinsurance,’ do you understand what it means?

By Bob Herum, Second Vice President, DI & GSI Sales, Ameritas

I picture the millions of working Americans who are employed, receive benefits through their employers, and yet, go about their daily activities without realizing the potential financial risk to their way of life. Specifically, I’m thinking of their income and what insurance they may have in place if they were hurt or became too sick to work—even for a few months.

Most working Americans depend on their income to pay their bills, yet few prepare for the devastating financial impact caused by temporary (or longer-term) illnesses and injuries. A third of employers in the U.S.—particularly large ones—provide a group long-term disability plan, however, few employees could describe the group plan they have through work or what it covers. Many workers assume the insurance they have through work or from social programs, like Social Security Disability Income insurance or worker’s compensation, will be sufficient if the need arises. Unfortunately, reality is likely much different.

Let’s consider an employee with traditional group long-term disability coverage through work. The employer usually pays some or all of the premium cost, which makes the benefit taxable and results in you receiving less money. We’ll also assume the plan design covers 60 percent of your “base earnings.” Base earnings typically don’t include variable compensation like bonuses, over-time, commissions or other employer-provided perks—leaving your additional income uninsured.

Here’s an example:

Base earnings $75,000 annually, or $6,250 per month.

60 percent of base earnings is $45,000, or $3,750 per month.

Assuming a 10 percent effective tax rate for federal and 4 percent for the state means that the $45,000 annual disability benefit is reduced to approximately $38,700, or $3,225 per month. I think it’s safe to say few people are aware of the impact of taxes on their disability insurance payments. The effects on an individual’s or family’s finances could be devastating if you needed to access your benefits.

This impact is even more of an issue when you have significant variable income not covered under the definition of the group LTD contract. Business owners, sales people and employees who are eligible for bonuses and/or commissions may find the group plan even more inadequate since many group LTD contracts do not include that additional income in the calculation of benefits.

Another issue that may affect the more highly-compensated individuals is the group plan “LTD cap,”which is the maximum amount of benefit payable under the plan. Smaller employers usually have caps of $10,000 a month or less. It’s important to know that a 60 percent plan is by its design is going to limit the covered incomes as follows:

Cap                               Salary Covered 

$10,000/month                  $200,000

$7,500/month                    $150,000

$6,000/month                    $120,000

$4,000/month                    $100,000

When employees rely solely on their group LTD coverage, the percentage of income replaced can be inadequate. A better strategy you may want to consider is to add individual supplemental disability insurance coverage because the combination of the two protects a larger percentage of your income by filling in the gaps left by your group LTD coverage.

In addition to understanding how your group LTD plan works (if you have one), it is important to also know about how income protection options available from other sources work. Two other common sources of income when you cannot work are Social Security Disability Insurance and worker’s compensation. These programs do not pay you benefits in all situations and the process to qualify for SSDI can be lengthy. While each is important and should not be ignored, the reality is neither program will most likely allow you to continue your current lifestyle if you need to tap into these programs.

The SSDI program provides disability benefits to those with significant impairments and uses the following criteria to determine if you are eligible for benefits.

The definition of disability under Social Security is different than other programs. Social Security pays only for total disability. No benefits are payable for partial disability or for short-term disability.

We consider you disabled under Social Security rules if:

  • You cannot do work that you did before;
  • We decide that you cannot adjust to other work because of your medical condition(s); and
  • Your disability has lasted or is expected to last for at least one year or to result in death.

If you are denied SSDI benefits you may file an appeal. This process can take several months to several years before a determination is made.

If you qualify for SSDI benefits, it’s important to know that your payments start after five full months of total disability. This is far less comprehensive than found in most group LTD plans, which normally provide an elimination or waiting period that normally includes partial disability and includes an “own occupation” definition of disability, followed by an “any occupation” definition, based upon your background, training or prior income.

In addition, SSDI provides a bare-bones level of protection. For example, someone meeting the annual income maximum for withholdings ($128,400 for 2018) would qualify for a $2,886/month, or $34,632 annually, which is 27 percent of their pre-disability income. As your income rises above the withholding amount, that percentage continues to reduce.

And, one final note: 85 percent of your SSDI benefit is also subject to federal income tax withholdings.

Worker’s compensation is another social program employees often think they can rely upon. It’s difficult to generalize about WC because each state program is unique. The primary purpose of WC is to provide benefits to workers who are injured or become ill on the job. These benefits may include income payments, medical assistance and vocational rehabilitation support.

Here’s the bottom line: Most employees would be well served by taking time to understand their income protection options and develop a plan from there. For employees who have short- and long-term disability insurance through work, I recommend asking your HR department for additional information about how the program works. A good first step is to ask for and review the group LTD booklet. This is usually available on your employer’s intranet site. If supplemental disability insurance is available through your employer’s benefit plan, strongly considered adding this coverage. You may be able to also take your supplemental coverage with you if you move on to another employer. Group LTD plans seldom are portable, and even if they are, they usually only continue for 12 or 24 months.

Having your own individual long-term disability plan may be the best investment in maintaining your lifestyle if you become injured or ill.




Selecting benefits and insurance products that make sense for you

By Carol Harnett, President, Council for Disability Awareness

Note: An earlier version of this post appeared in Carol Harnett’s employee benefits column for Human Resource Executive.

You don’t know me, but I’m someone people have come to trust when they want to have a conversation about employee benefits. I stand to neither gain nor lose anything based on the choices you will make during your annual benefits enrollment period. Except for this: Based upon my life experiences, I’d like to see you make the best choices you can.

It’s challenging for your employer to provide you with the types of suggestions I’m going to make. This is largely based on the fact your human resource leaders can’t give you direct advice.

There is one key assessment I believe is important to make when choosing your benefits, and that is how to understand risk.

I spent the first 10 years of my career training elite athletes who “sneer at risk.” They push themselves to the edge of what their bodies can do and return every day to do that again and again – even after experiencing major injuries. They, their significant others or their parents also go to considerable expense to make certain they receive the best training, medical care and rehabilitation available.

The rest of my career has revolved around how to get people to the best quality healthcare – both to treat and prevent injuries, illnesses, accidents, temporary and permanent disabilities, and more minor health conditions such as pregnancies, bad backs and torn-up knees. As a result, I’ve developed a contact list of medical specialists who make a difference in helping people recover in a way that, sometimes, makes a life-altering difference.

Here’s one of the things that’s been frustrating the heck out of me the last few years. I’ll receive a phone call from a friend or acquaintance seeking a referral to a physician or healthcare provider. Very often I know someone who could help them – and here’s where the “but” comes in. This person can’t see this individual because they selected a health plan that limited their provider and medical center choices. At the time, it seemed like a good call. Limited network –and high-deductible – plans are more affordable.

I’d suggest that the first question you need to answer when assessing your health plan benefit selection is, if you or your loved ones needed to see the best healthcare provider, would you want that choice available to you? There is no shame in saying “no.” You might have to travel to see this person or go to that center of excellence, and it’s simply something you know you couldn’t or wouldn’t do. Understand that part of yourself now, before you select your health plan.

The other thing that worries me when people are making their benefits choices is they don’t think about if they can afford to be out of work for a period of time. The reason? It comes down again to how we assess our risks. Most of us don’t think anything will happen to us, so we don’t worry that we won’t be able to work for a period of time. Or, we believe we’ll have enough vacation time to cover an unpaid absence. Or, we think our parents or friends will loan us money.

Let me give you a snippet from my own life. During my working years, I’ve had two mountain-biking accidents that placed me on the disabled list, plus two concussions, two stress fractures, two broken toes, three episodes of back pain and a torn MCL. You may call me unlucky; I will tell you I live life off the sidelines. And so do most of you – whether you realize it or not.

So, first, make certain you understand your employer’s paid-time-off or vacation/sick time policies. This will give you good information about how vulnerable you might be financially if you leave work to have a child, or to repair your bunions, or take care of a sprained back, knee or shoulder – never mind if something more complicated happens.

My recommendation to you will always be to take advantage of your employer’s short- and/or long-term disability insurance policies. They are inexpensive and cost-effective ways to make certain you can afford to be out of work (and help you pay for associated costs such as money toward your high-deductible, co-pay or co-insurance).

Once you’ve consciously checked the boxes on the two things people who work tell me are most important to them – their health and their income – take a serious look at other benefits associated with an income stream such as your retirement plan. Make certain you know if and when you are eligible to receive retirement income from your employer, and how you can contribute the most money possible toward retirement programs such as 401(k) and 403(b) programs. Just as none of us think we’ll ever become ill, injured or experience an accident, we also think retirement is a far-away concept. Make certain to at least make a start with contributions.

What about the rest of your employee benefits options? Trust me, there are some wonderful benefits out there. If you have children, dental and vision insurance may be high on your priority list. But, before making those selections before the ones described above, make certain you understand the benefits and limitations to these policies. You may find there is an annual or a lifetime cap on benefits that doesn’t make these choices a good investment for you.

The bottom line for me every year? I consciously make certain I have the best help available to me through my benefits selections if something were to happen to my health or my income. And then I make sure I can retire from this part of my working life at a point of my choosing. I wish you the same.




Beyond medical: How supplemental benefits help attract and retain talent

By Phil Bruen, Vice President, Group Life and Disability Products, MetLife

As the annual enrollment period takes place in workplaces around the United States, human resources teams and employees have benefits on their minds. During this time, it’s important for employers to educate their workforces on how the benefits they provide can help workers achieve their short- and long-term financial goals.

To do this, employees should use the information their company provides related to benefits and also seek guidance from those they trust most. Doing so, even more so than a major life event, can cause individuals to not just evaluate, but act on benefits that meet their needs.

Employers who are competing for the best talent find that providing benefits to support the financial well-being of their workforce is necessary. According to MetLife’s 16th Annual Employee Benefit Trends Study (EBTS), less than half of workers believe their employer understands their personal financial pressures.

The benefits offered to employees during their annual enrollment period go well beyond basic health insurance. Products such as dental and vision insurance, accident and critical illness coverage, and disability insurance provide additional financial support for costs beyond what medical insurance covers. Workers need to view all employee benefits as a critically important part of their health and financial wellbeing. Their benefits package is necessary to protect employees’ life goals, such as purchasing a home or sending children to college.

Why peace of mind matters

The recent MetLife study revealed that employees use their benefits to fulfill a need greater than a visit to the dentist or a more affordable way to get glasses. On the whole, today’s workforce relies on their benefits as a financial safety net—benefits give them peace of mind.

For example, 71 percent of employees say their benefits help them worry less about unexpected financial or health issues. Additionally, 65 percent say their non-medical benefits help limit their out of pocket medical expenses. Understanding these deeper advantages of benefits helps HR leaders serve employees better. It also pays off for companies as well as our research shows that benefits increase employee loyalty, engagement and even productivity.

But for many companies, the big question is how to offer more benefits without incurring outsized expenses. The answer rests in creating options for employees to customize their benefit offerings. The good news? Employees are ready to help, since 60 percent said they’d like their employer to offer a wider array of benefits that they can choose to purchase.

Getting beyond medical

When you think outside of the traditional health insurance box, some of the most important and sought after benefits fall into these three categories:

1. Disability insurance and income replacement. More than one in four adults who are currently 20-years-old can expect to be out of work for at least a year because of a disabling condition before they retire.[1] And yet less than half of Americans report they have enough savings to cover even three months of their living expenses.[2] Providing an option for short- and long-term disability insurance offers employees a simple way to keep unexpected events from turning into financial disasters.

2. Supplemental health benefits. Today’s employees want and need a solid health insurance plan. But for most individuals and families, that’s only a component of their overall healthcare. For example, 53 percent of employees consider dental insurance a “must-have,” and 37 percent say the same about vision care. Other key offerings that employers can consider include hospital indemnity, critical illness, and accident insurance, all of which supplement health plans, and provide employees with additional financial resources when they may need them most.

3. Retirement and financial wellness. Nearly three-quarters of employees report that saving for retirement is a priority—and nearly half say they’re already concerned about outliving their savings, according to the 2018 MetLife research. Traditional employer-sponsored retirement plans certainly provide the financial security and savings that employees want. But additional benefits such as lifetime income solutions, life insurance products and financial planning, and education services work to strengthen overall benefit plans and give workers additional ways to prepare for retirement.

In an increasingly competitive job market, employee benefits truly help elevate companies in the minds of their current employees—as well as the people businesses want to attract and retain. As HR executives find creative ways to build out their benefits, they also prepare their businesses and workforce for a better future.

[1] Disability Statistics, The Council for Disability Awareness, http://disabilitycanhappen.org/overview/ accessed September, 2018

[2] Chances of a Disability, Ibid, The Council for Disability Awareness, http://disabilitycanhappen.org/disability-statistic/ updated March 28, 2018

Looking for more information on supplemental benefits? Join Phil Bruen and Carol Harnett as they discuss consumer strategies this open enrollment season on the CDA’s BlogTalkRadio.




Study shows LGBTQ Americans in need of retirement strategy guidance

A recent study from Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. (MassMutual) revealed lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning (LGBTQ) Americans say they want to preserve their retirement savings but tend to take bigger risks when it comes to investing.

Forty-two percent of LGBTQ retirees and pre-retirees said the should become more conservative with their money as they come closer to retirement, as opposed to 28 percent who said they prefer a more aggressive investment approach.

However, 65 percent of those respondents say their investment strategy is actually more mixed, rather than conservative, compared to 52 percent of the general population — 31 percent of respondents admitted they could be taking more risks than they should be, compared to 22 percent of other retirees and pre-retirees.

“MassMutual’s study shows that many LGBTQ retirees and pre-retirees may benefit from consulting a financial advisor about their retirement investment goals, something less than half currently do, and may benefit from help leading into retirement and securing their finances through retirement,” said Catherine Cannon, Head of Personal Markets at MassMutual.

“Of those respondents in our study who do work with a financial advisor, six in 10 say their advisor has encouraged them to change their investment mix and 87 percent of those folks were advised to become more conservative as they enter retirement.”

Both the general population and LGBTQ retirees expect their retirement savings to last 25 years, however overall, LGBTQ retirees plan to retire later than the general population. In addition, the same respondents said they expect their retirement income will last as long as they need, which is two years fewer than the general population.

LGBTQ retirees also expressed more confidence than the general population that they will be financially prepared for retirement. However, despite this confidence, stock market volatility and downturn in the stick market are worrisome for the community as they approach retirement. About 75 percent of respondents expressed this concern, with 27 percent say they are “very concerned.”

72 percent of the general population expressed concern with regard to market volatility, while 21 percent said they are “very concerned.”

According to the study, LGBTQ respondents show greater comfort in taking investment risk, with just 20 percent willing to accept “below average” or “low investment returns” in exchange for greater safety. Overall, respondents seem to seek a balance between growth and preservation.

“One strategy that may help some LGBTQ retirement savers balance investment goals such as growth and safety is the use of target date funds (TDFs) when available through their employer’s 401(k) or other retirement savings plan,” Cannon said.

“TDFs automatically reallocate retirement savings between equities and fixed-income, gradually growing more conservative as the investor approaches and enters retirement. Some newer TDFs also are more personalized to investor’s individual needs, including a greater focus on managing assets in accordance with an investor’s individual risk tolerance.”




For millennials, app use and financial literacy don’t go hand in hand

A recent study released last week found despite the number of financial apps millennials are using, their personal finance management skills are severely lacking.

The report, released by the TIAA Institute and the Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC) at the George Washington University School of Business, examined the personal finance knowledge of millennials.

Titled “Millennial Financial Literacy and Fin-Tech Use: Who Knows What in the Digital Era,” the study utilized the TIAA Institute-GFLEC 2018 Personal Finance Index (P-Fin Index) to test millennials’ finance knowledge and found that 44 percent of millennials answered the P-Fin Index questions correctly, compared to 50 percent of the US adult population.

In addition, younger millennials (ages 18-27) answered 41 percent of P-Fin Index questions correctly, compared to 47 percent of older millennials (ages 28-37).

“The millennial oversample in this year’s P-Fin Index sheds a light on the use of mobile technology, and the impact that it has had on an increasingly influential generation,” said Stephanie Bell-Rose, Head of the TIAA Institute.

“As technology continues to develop ways to make our lives easier, it is clear that we cannot exclusively rely on it to guide us through our financial lives. Our research underscores the importance of financial literacy and its complementary relationship with fin-tech in producing good outcomes.”

Both older and younger millennials are hurting most in the areas of understanding risk and insuring, the study found. Understanding insurance, in particular, saw the greatest gap between younger and older millennials. Financial literacy is highest in the area of borrowing and debt management for both younger and older millennials.

The study also looked at how millennials use these apps to track their personal finances, as well as the effect of this fin-tech on financial outcomes.

About 80 percent of millennials use their smartphones to do things like pay bills and deposit checks, while 90 percent use their phones for things like tracking spending.

However, although apps make it easy to manage money, those who do via the technology don’t always make financially savvy decisions. Almost 30 percent of millennials who use their smartphone to make mobile payments report overdrawing their checking account, compared with 20 percent who do not make mobile payments.

In addition, one-quarter of those who track spending with their smartphone report overdrawing their accounts, compared with 20 percent of those who do not track spending via their smartphone.

“The low level of financial literacy among millennials speaks of the importance of equipping this large generation with the knowledge and skills that are needed to make financial decisions in the digital era,” said Annamaria Lusardi, Academic Director at GFLEC and the Denit Trust Chair of Economics and Accountancy at GW.

“This study shows that fin-tech users have different needs and characteristics, providing many opportunities for innovation for fin-tech developers.”

 

 




US employers doubt employees’ ability to achieve a financially secure retirement

Only 16 percent of employers are “very confident” their employees will be able to achieve a financially secure retirement. This statistic was brought to light thanks to a recently completed survey titled Striking Similarities and Disconcerting Disconnects: Employers, Workers, and Retirement Security, by nonprofit Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies (TCRS).

Given the large role employers play in this field, the statistic is alarming, yet it does correspond with the 18 percent of employees who are “very confident” they’ll be able to fully retire with a comfortable lifestyle.

The TCRS 18th Annual Retirement Survey, released August 21, 2018, looked at 1,825 employers for for-profit companies with five or more employees. The goal? To learn how these companies are helping employees prepare for retirement. The study also provided some context by comparing employer findings with TCRS’ survey of 6,372 workers.

Getting into specifics, the survey outlined a number of ways employers are out-of-sync with workers in both their perceptions and business practices. For example, many workers plan to work past age 65, but employers and employees in the like are unsure if the employer will support them.

In addition, just 20 percent of employers offer a formal phased retirement program, although 47 percent of workers surveyed envision a phased transition that includes reducing work hours or working in a different capacity that’s less demanding.

The survey also took a closer look at the current state of 401(k)s and opportunities to enhance retirement security. Catherine Collinson, CEO and president of TCRS, reiterated that 401k opportunities continue to be an effective way to facilitate long-term savings among workers.

However, “not all workers have equal access,” Collinson said. “For example, large companies typically provide more robust benefit offerings than their small business counterparts.”

The study examined the current state of 401(k)s and other benefit offerings by small (5 to 99 employees), medium (100 to 499 employees), and large companies (500+ employees).

Other key findings included that retirement plan sponsorship rates increase with company size, most non-sponsors are not planning to offer a plan, and few part-time employees are eligible to participate in these plans.

Additionally, adoption of automatic enrollment, surprisingly, is low. Although 81 percent of workers find automatic enrollment appealing, only 22 percent of plan sponsors have adopted automatic enrollment, including 28 percent of both large and medium companies.

 

 

 




7 ways to keep employee benefits top of mind

HR works hard to find the best benefits program for employees and then communicate the “benefits of the benefits,” so to speak. But sometimes, even with the best of intentions, the information falls on deaf ears – or blind eyes. In fact, one recent study found that less than half of employees know what benefits are available to them, and yet nearly the same percentage said they would consider leaving their current job because the benefits are inadequate.

That means that HR has a job to do to keep their benefit offerings fresh in employees’ minds.

Follow up shortly after onboarding.

The first day can be a whirlwind for employees who are meeting new faces and receiving a barrage of information from everyone from their manager to, yes, the HR team. But think about it – new people who don’t even yet know where the copy machine is probably aren’t paying as much attention as they should to the benefits package, especially lesser-known programs like disability insurance. Naturally there is some paperwork they have to sign right away, but after that, give them a couple of weeks to settle in and then resume the benefits discussion. They might be much more tuned in once they’ve figured out the basics of their job.

Upgrade your website.

No longer do you have to depend on explaining your benefits program via a sheaf of papers that employees stow in their desks, never to see again. Chances are good your website probably already has the information, but is it easy to access and intuitive? The interface should be easy to read so that employees can visit and find what they need without endless scrolling or clicking. Consider talking to a web designer – either in-house or a contractor – who can help you design your website with marketing best practices in mind. After all, marketing your benefits (and by extension, your company) is exactly what you’re doing.

Present information in different ways.

Some of us love to read. Some of us love in-person presentations. Younger generations like millennials are all about the visuals. So even though it might entail a little extra work, commit to creating your materials in several different formats so you are bound to reach employees in the way that works for them. This strategy even has a great name – COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere).

Use multi-channel options.

In addition to different formats, you’ll want to distribute the information using different channels. A short text might remind employees that open enrollment is coming up. An email can provide detailed links to a wide variety of benefits. Your social media platforms can show some of your more “fun” benefits being used, such as employees taking a noontime walk as part of your wellness initiative or a group enjoying a team-building activity. Not only will social media remind employees of what’s available, but it also paints your company positively to others who are following your channels.

Ask for feedback.

Wondering what employees think of your benefits? A survey is an ideal way to get feedback with suggestions that can help you fine-tune your offerings, and it can identify what benefits employees don’t know about yet so you can determine where more communication is needed. It also allows you to raise awareness of some lesser-known programs; employees might not even realize how many programs you offer until they read about them on the survey.

Set up a hotline.

Have a dedicated number that employees can call if they have questions (and make sure someone returns the calls diligently if they leave a message). Call attention to the number by playing a game and awarding a $5 coffee card to any employee who knows the number when you ask them.

Pay them to learn more.

What? Why would you do that? Well, because it works, found Pierre-Renaud Tremblay, director of human resources for steam cleaning products company Dupray. Dismayed by a dismal 12 percent open rate on his emails, he upped the ante by developing online quizzes covering the material from the emails, offering gift certificates for employees who scored well, Forbes reports. He found his email open rate skyrocket to up to 95 percent.

And if more information about benefits helps satisfy employees, which contributes to retention, it will be money well spent.




Relocation and your social security disability insurance: Your questions answered

Part of the American dream is being footloose and fancy free…and whether you are relocating to be nearer family, to find a place with a lower cost of living or just to see some new scenery, you probably will move at some point in your lifetime.

But in the midst of the goodbye parties, the packing and the moving, don’t neglect important tasks that are necessary for your financial well-being. And chief among them should be making sure that you have taken care of your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or SSI (Supplemental Security Income) benefits before you relocate.

Here’s everything you need to know for a smooth move.

What is the difference between SSDI and SSI?

First, it’s important to know which of these programs you use. SSDI is the program that provides payments to those who are disabled or blind who qualify due to their work history – they have worked in jobs where they have paid FICA benefits.

SSI is a need-based program that makes payments to the elderly, blind and disabled who have limited incomes.

Will I have to reapply for SSDI and SSI if I move?

The good news is that it doesn’t matter if you move across town or to another state: You won’t have to for reapply these programs, which are overseen by the federal government, rather than individual states. That makes it easy for you to carry it over even if you move across the country.

However, whether you receive SSDI or SSI, you do need to make sure that you have changed your address so they know how to reach you should there changes to your benefits or other paperwork you need to file to remain eligible.

If you receive SSI, there’s another factor to consider — there could be a change to your payment based on what state you live in. That’s because most beneficiaries (except those who live in Arizona, Mississippi, North Dakota or West Virginia) also receive a state supplement. The amount varies by state, so when you move, you then qualify for your new state’s supplement, rather than your previous one. (You can find more details here.)

Also, some states disburse their own state supplements while others are handled by the Social Security Administration. If your old state and new state are both administered by the SSA, then there should be no lapse. But if you are moving to a state that administers its own supplemental program, you’ll need to apply in that state.

There also may be changes based on your living situation; i.e. if you are moving in with additional housemates who are covering part of your food and housing, your benefits may be reduced.

When should I contact the government about my change of address?

Don’t delay…you’ll want to put this on your “to do list” right away. If you are receiving SSI, you need to report the new address within 10 days after the month the change occurs so they can adjust your state supplement. Otherwise you might receive less than you are owed or too much – in which case you will have to refund the money — and you also might be charged a penalty.

The good news is you can handle it with a simple phone call to the Social Security office at 800-772-1213 or online here.

What other disability insurance might I qualify for?

Most people find that the amount they would receive from the SSDI or SSI benefits is not adequate to cover all their financial needs. That’s why it’s important to sign up for a group or individual disability policy that will protect your income and provide financial security if you should become disabled.

While it’s not fun to think about, the truth is that disability is far more common than one might think…in fact, nearly 25 percent of those who are 20 years old today will be out of work for at least a year due to a health condition before they reach retirement age.

If you have to stop working temporarily or permanently, disability insurance will kick in – providing the paycheck protection you need to ensure that your bills remain covered.




What’s considered a disability? 10 causes every HR leader should know

When most people consider disability, they picture something catastrophic happening—an ill-timed dive off a high rock, or a speeding car hurtling into theirs—and, for the most part assume it can never happen to them.

That’s why human resources experts often find it challenging to convince their employees of the importance of disability insurance even though you know it’s a wise investment and more commonly used than most people assume. In fact, if you were to keep track of the 20-year-olds in today’s workforce, you’d find out that nearly 25 percent of them will be out of work for at least a year due to a health condition before they reach retirement age.

The statistic isn’t meant to alarm anyone, but rather to underscore the importance of making sure that your team members realize that disability insurance is for everyone. It can be the lifeline they need in the case of an unexpected condition—and yet at least 51 million working adults go without disability coverage, except for the basic coverage offered through Social Security.

That can be downright scary considering the precarious financial position of many Americans—and the skyrocketing cost of medical treatment. Any of these conditions can rob workers of the opportunity to earn enough to pay their bills, and just when they need the extra income the most.

Wondering what the top causes of long-term disability are? Your employees might be surprised to learn that they are relatively common occurrences.

  1. Muscoskeletal. This is a fancy way of saying “back pain,” something weekend warriors—or even just good Samaritans helping a friend move—can probably see themselves experiencing. It also covers other muscle, back, and joint disorders, such as arthritis. Together, these conditions account for nearly 30 percent of all long-term disabilities.
  2. Cancer. Yes, we can put this in the “catastrophic” category, but it’s actually more prevalent than you might imagine. In fact, more than 70,000 people in their 20s and 30s—the prime of their life—are diagnosed with cancers, including lymphoma, leukemia, testicular, melanoma, and breast cancer. Even if they are eventually cured, cancer treatment can decimate a family’s finances as they miss work to undergo treatment.
  3. Pregnancy. It’s hard to consider pregnancy as a “long-term” disability, but the bottom line is that pregnancy (think bed rest) and childbirth can infringe on work, especially if there are complications. In fact, about 1/10 of all claims involve a pregnancy-related issue, but by tapping long-term disability insurance, your employee and their little bundle of joy can be covered.
  4. Mental health issues. From anxiety to depression, mental health problems can take a toll, and fortunately, people are realizing that mental health is just as vital to treat as physical health. Since over a quarter of the population is diagnosed with one or more mental disorders each year, it’s easy to see how they can be a leading cause of long-term disability.
  5. Injuries. Nine percent of long-term disability claims come from the “injury” category, which covers everything from accident recovery to surgery, broken bones, and even poisoning.
  6. Cardiovascular issues. From heart attack to stroke, cardiovascular events strike unexpectedly and can prevent employees from coming to work for an indefinite period of time as they build their strength back up.
  7. Nervous system. This category encompasses a wide range of potential issues that include multiple sclerosis, Lou Gehrig’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and epilepsy, plus a range of additional eye and ear disorders. Even conditions that are often considered an older person’s disease, such as Alzheimer’s, can strike during peak earning years. In fact about 200,000 people contract the early-onset form of Alzheimer’s, which typically develops in their 40s and 50s.
  8. Infectious diseases. While headlines trumpet new types of infectious diseases, from zika to MRSA, this category also encompasses far less-exotic strains, such as bacteria that causes strep throat and viruses that bring on the flu. As more conditions become resistant to today’s hardest-working antibiotics, the threat of losing work due to infectious disease grows more prevalent.
  9. Digestive system. Celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are just three of the better-known conditions in the digestive diseases category. Altogether there are 40 digestive conditions that plague more than 34 million Americans, causing them to miss work as they wrestle with treatment and prevention.
  10. Respiratory diseases. Asthma is one of the most common chronic respiratory conditions, which also include a wide variety of other lung-related ailments. It’s not a leap to assume that difficulty in breathing would lead to difficulty in working…illuminating the need for long-term disability insurance.

No one wants to sit down with employees to go over a list of illnesses or conditions they may eventually have, but the good news is that human resources professionals have the opportunity to expose their colleagues to one of the best-kept secrets in the benefit world—how disability insurance can help prevent them from losing a paycheck just when they need it most.




Why Waiting to Buy Income Protection Can Cost You Big Time

Couple sitting at a laptop.Like many others in their 20s, I remember not being thrilled about the chunk of income that was taken every month by insurance. It always seemed like money that was going out and would never come back in and felt especially significant at a time when my income was low.

The temptation was always to either skimp on insurance, wait until my income increased, or bypass it altogether. The same holds true for many people today when it comes to income protection, an insurance policy that replaces your income if you are unable to work due to an accident or sickness. While the reluctance to spend more on insurable is understandable, it’s important to take the time to discuss the cost of waiting to purchase this important coverage.

Here are the three major costs to be aware of:

Cost 1: You’re most insurable when you’re young

When you are young, you are generally in the best health of your life. As you get older, nagging injuries and health issues tend to pop up. This can affect the policy terms of your disability insurance (DI) policy. The older you get when applying for DI coverage, the more likely it is that your policy will include restrictions like exclusions, ratings, and even being declined altogether.

For example, if you have a serious back issue, the insurance company may offer a policy with a back exclusion meaning that they would not pay out benefits if you were unable to work due to an issue with your back. Or, if you have a history of heart issues, the insurance company may include a modification like adding extra premium to cover their extra risk. Of our office’s current issued policies that were issued medically as applied for (no medical exclusions or modifications), 67 percent were under the age of 40! The time to get coverage is when you are young and at your most insurable. Many carriers will also allow you to purchase increase options which means you will be able to increase your coverage in the future to keep pace with your income but not have to complete any medical underwriting.

Cost 2: Premiums increase

The premium cost for coverage goes up as you get older. In addition to health considerations that may increase your premium, the cost for coverage is also based on age.

The chart below shows premiums of different occupations at age 25 and age 40—note there’s up to a 70 percent increase in premium from age 25 to age 40. If the 40 year old dentist purchases coverage and keeps it inforce until age 66, he will still end up paying out more total in premium than if he purchased coverage at age 25. He also misses out on 15 years of income protection.

Male Rates  Dentist College Professor Pediatrician Executive
Annual premium at age 25* $1,198.40 $1,000.30 $880.95 $704.55
Annual premium at age 40* $2,013.20 $1,704.50 $1,477.35 $1,181.60
Percentage Increase 68% 70% 67% 68%

 

Female Rates  Dentist College Professor Pediatrician Executive
Annual premium at age 25* $2,053.45 $1,637.65 $1,399.30 $1,119.65
Annual premium at age 40* $3,326.05 $2,789.85 $2,382.45 $1,906.10
Percentage Increase 62% 70% 70% 70%

*Premiums shown are for illustrations done for $3500/mo of benefit, with typical options including noncancellable (premiums cannot be changed), residual (return to work benefits), 3% COLA (inflation protection), 90 day wait, benefits paid to age 65, KS resident.

Cost 3: Peace of mind

While we tend to think we are invincible while we are young, the truth is that disabilities can happen to anyone at any age. The Council for Disability Report in 2014 shows that ages 40 and under filed 21 percent of all disability claims in 2013.

Know that there are ways to address the very real concerns about fitting the cost of income protection into your budget. There are a lot of options to keep the coverage affordable including multi-life discounts, business owner discounts, or simply making changes to the amount of monthly benefit or benefit duration. Many people start with a minimal benefit amount and include a rider called an increase option so they can increase their benefits as their income grows regardless of their medical insurability.

For more information about the importance of income protection and the risk of disability, visit www.RealityCheckup.org.