Relocation and your social security disability insurance: Your questions answered

Part of the American dream is being footloose and fancy free…and whether you are relocating to be nearer family, to find a place with a lower cost of living or just to see some new scenery, you probably will move at some point in your lifetime.

But in the midst of the goodbye parties, the packing and the moving, don’t neglect important tasks that are necessary for your financial well-being. And chief among them should be making sure that you have taken care of your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or SSI (Supplemental Security Income) benefits before you relocate.

Here’s everything you need to know for a smooth move.

What is the difference between SSDI and SSI?

First, it’s important to know which of these programs you use. SSDI is the program that provides payments to those who are disabled or blind who qualify due to their work history – they have worked in jobs where they have paid FICA benefits.

SSI is a need-based program that makes payments to the elderly, blind and disabled who have limited incomes.

Will I have to reapply for SSDI and SSI if I move?

The good news is that it doesn’t matter if you move across town or to another state: You won’t have to for reapply these programs, which are overseen by the federal government, rather than individual states. That makes it easy for you to carry it over even if you move across the country.

However, whether you receive SSDI or SSI, you do need to make sure that you have changed your address so they know how to reach you should there changes to your benefits or other paperwork you need to file to remain eligible.

If you receive SSI, there’s another factor to consider — there could be a change to your payment based on what state you live in. That’s because most beneficiaries (except those who live in Arizona, Mississippi, North Dakota or West Virginia) also receive a state supplement. The amount varies by state, so when you move, you then qualify for your new state’s supplement, rather than your previous one. (You can find more details here.)

Also, some states disburse their own state supplements while others are handled by the Social Security Administration. If your old state and new state are both administered by the SSA, then there should be no lapse. But if you are moving to a state that administers its own supplemental program, you’ll need to apply in that state.

There also may be changes based on your living situation; i.e. if you are moving in with additional housemates who are covering part of your food and housing, your benefits may be reduced.

When should I contact the government about my change of address?

Don’t delay…you’ll want to put this on your “to do list” right away. If you are receiving SSI, you need to report the new address within 10 days after the month the change occurs so they can adjust your state supplement. Otherwise you might receive less than you are owed or too much – in which case you will have to refund the money — and you also might be charged a penalty.

The good news is you can handle it with a simple phone call to the Social Security office at 800-772-1213 or online here.

What other disability insurance might I qualify for?

Most people find that the amount they would receive from the SSDI or SSI benefits is not adequate to cover all their financial needs. That’s why it’s important to sign up for a group or individual disability policy that will protect your income and provide financial security if you should become disabled.

While it’s not fun to think about, the truth is that disability is far more common than one might think…in fact, nearly 25 percent of those who are 20 years old today will be out of work for at least a year due to a health condition before they reach retirement age.

If you have to stop working temporarily or permanently, disability insurance will kick in – providing the paycheck protection you need to ensure that your bills remain covered.