Millennials Got Older, but Their Financial Attitudes are Young

Dec-AgingMillenial-imageIf you still think Millennials are “young,” you may be a little off. They became adults in the year 2000, and today most are over the age of 30. Some are even grandparents. Looking back 17 years ago when Millennials were the “kids” in high school or college, the future looked wide open and bright. And in many ways, it was, as they became the first truly “digital generation.”

 

An Entrepreneurial Spirit

However, for many of them, economic and employment realities have taken the luster off their bigger dreams. Though Millennials are the most educated generation in history, they also have the highest student loan burdens of any age group. Many are living paycheck to paycheck and barely 25% of then have enough savings to last at three months. And those without income protection are even more vulnerable to financial stress. Not surprisingly, Millennials have shorter-term financial goals and are delaying important financial decisions like saving for retirement.

 

And though they often feel overeducated and under-employed, strong optimism is still a theme for many Millennials. Rather than following traditional employment paths, a large percentage want to launch their own businesses in the near future. With the right resources, 54% would quit their jobs and start a business next year.

 

Financing for the Future

For Millennials who are more secure financially, their view of the future sounds, well, very adult. Many are looking at getting their second mortgage, not their first. And having survived for years driving high-mileage beaters, many Millennials are considering buying their second or third car.

 

To make those kinds of purchases and to manage their finances, Millennials have turned the way people bank inside out. As the digital-from-birth generation, 74% of them prefer mobile banking instead of desktop banking or banking in person. They access their financial accounts via a mobile app nearly three times more often than any other group. And, according to a Vocalink study, more than half of Millennials prefer mobile banking with an iPhone.

 

However, banks don’t need to fret. Increasingly, Millennials are beginning to make more branch visits to seek expert advice for mortgages or for business planning. They even use ATMs more frequently than their non-Millennial counterparts.

 

Embracing New Technologies

As Americans of all ages are increasingly relying on mobile and online banking, Millennials are still setting new paths. While most people are just getting use to voice-activated devices from Amazon, Google and Apple, voice banking is being quickly adapted by Millennials. Nearly 68% of them would check their balances by voice commands and 46% would feel at ease paying bills by voice.

 

Though they more in debt and working harder to get by, many of today’s Millennials don’t look at work as simply a way to make money. They have disrupted the workplace forever by bringing more focus on creativity, entrepreneurship, working collaboratively and yes, by still trying to make a difference in the world.