Team-Building Activities Your Team Will Actually Love

Trust falls. Ropes courses. Bowling or mini golf. Many offices plan a summer team-building activity designed for camaraderie, but forced group fun can cause anxiety in many. Maybe your office mates don’t know each other particularly well, or there are people of so many ages and ability levels that anything too physical can be a non-starter. The great news is that there are still a wide variety of team-building activities you can plan that everyone will love. Here are six to consider.

 

Throw a board game competition.

 

Not everyone’s great at kickball or golf but almost anyone can find the fun in a round of Monopoly or Sorry. Board games are having a resurgence, and it’s easy to see why. Everyone takes turns, works cooperatively and has a blast. Consider classics from everyone’s childhood or find a new one where everyone can learn the rules together. Depending on the size of your office, you can allow people to choose from among several or rotate every 45 minutes or so. Keep the competition level light and the snacks heavy.

 

Host a scavenger hunt.

This is another cooperative game that can be fun for all ages and abilities. Compile a list of offbeat items both inside the office and outside – if you’re close to a city, head downtown for even more fun. Have the gang take photos of the items they find, and gather back at the office after an hour or two to share wild stories and enjoy a snack.

 

Trade jobs.

What does Annette in accounting or Sam in sales do anyway? Sometimes walking a mile in another employee’s shoes can help promote better understanding – and possibly a renewed sense of appreciation and even patience. Work out a schedule where employees visit other departments to experience what others do; have each department offer a brief overview and then let the group loose to do a sample project — for example, working up a new client sales presentation or troubleshooting cybersecurity threats, just for fun, of course. After a couple of rotations, meet back and have the group share some observations or surprising insights about what they learned about other teams’ roles and challenges.

 

Plan a family day.

Often work activities fail because your employees may not want to give up precious free time to socialize with colleagues. That’s where a family fun day can serve triple duty –allowing them to be with their family, but also showing their family their workplace AND allowing coworkers to get to know each other better through their families.

Make sure there are suitable activities for all ages, from a bouncy house for the younger set, to games for older kids and a photo booth and plenty of food for everyone. If your budget allows, splurge on some sort of entertainment, maybe a music group or a family-friendly comedian. Make sure you have name tags on hand so everyone knows who belongs to who and plenty of action to encourage mingling.

 

Have a reading club.

If you don’t want to devote an entire afternoon or day to the team-building activity, or sense that this type of mixing wouldn’t be well-received by your staff, consider having a Book Club instead. Ask everyone to read the same book (you might provide copies so they don’t have to finance it) and give the team ample time to read the book and then hold a discussion to get everyone’s thoughts on it.

Not sure where to start? Here’s a list of recent business books that have gotten attention, or you might consider something by Malcolm Gladwell, who writes books full of engaging stories that have applications both for business and personal growth. Another option might be a book written by someone in your industry, such as “Shoe Dog” if you’re in retail or a creative field.

 

Volunteer together.

Believe it or not, almost half of respondents to one survey said their employer’s volunteer policies played a role in accepting an offer. While an ongoing volunteer program can be a powerful perk, even a one-day stint working as a group at a food bank, cooking a meal at a homeless shelter or assisting another non-profit that’s important to your team can help increase their bonds – and also give them the “helper’s high” that accompanies volunteering.

Not sure what project might resonate? Just ask! Maybe offer a couple of choices and either split up or let the group vote on which one might receive your collective power this time. Volunteering can be a huge win-win for your team and everyone whose lives they touch. And who knows…you might just spark an ongoing commitment for several of your team members.

 




Six Top Home Buyer Mistakes That Can Bust Your Budget – Solved

Ready to buy a home? The time could be right. In fact, in 2017, first-time buyers made up 35 percent of all home purchases, finds the 2017 National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study.

 

Buying a home will probably be the most expensive purchase you ever make, so it’s wise to make sure you’re making financially savvy moves.

 

Here are six common budget-busting mistakes first-time home buyers make and how to fix them.

 

Home Buyer Budget-Busting Mistake 1: Buying a house that needs a lot of work.

 

If the home inspection shows that you’ll soon need a big-ticket item like new windows or roof, foundation repair or an upgrade to the electrical system, you might want to reconsider – or at least ensure that the price you pay takes these costly upgrades into account. That’s because any of them can easily run you $10,000 and up, depending on the size of the job.

 

But an equally common home buyer mistake is avoiding homes that need cosmetic upgrades; say, one with unsightly wallpaper or outdated appliances. Most other home buyers might be snubbing the property, too, so it’s possible you can get a real bargain at purchase time, and then redo it to your satisfaction with some minor improvements when you move in.

 

Home Buyer Budget-Busting Mistake 2: Not thinking about the school district.

 

Don’t have kids or plan to move before they head to kindergarten? You might not even take the school district’s reputation into account, but that can be an expensive mistake when it eventually comes time to sell your home.

 

That’s because even if it doesn’t matter to you, it’s bound to matter to your future buyers. In fact, another study from NAR found that a quarter of home buyers named “school quality” as one of the most important factors in their buying decision. (This is a great site to visit for reviewing school district quality.)

 

Home Buyer Budget-Busting Mistake 3: Buying as much home as you can afford.

 

The mortgage amount that you are approved for and the amount you want to spend each month might not be the same. In fact, many new home buyers suddenly find themselves “house poor” when they stretch themselves to a house payment that’s at the limit of what they can comfortably afford.

 

Before committing to a loan amount, scrutinize your budget and see what areas you might have to cut back on – and if you’re willing to do so – from a weekly date night to a summer vacation. Also, don’t forget that a home purchase comes with a host of expenses that you might not be used to, from buying a lawn mower and new furniture, to paying for maintenance and repairs.

 

Home Buyer Budget-Busting Mistake 4: Not shopping around for a mortgage.

Finding out your options can save you a ton over the life of your loan. That’s because there are a crazy number of loan programs available — from conventional 30-year loans to Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs), FHA loans and others. Each one has pros and cons so make sure you work with a mortgage specialist who can help you understand the true cost of the loan, both in monthly payments and over the life of the loan. Sometimes a shorter term can save you big bucks in significantly lower interest payments over the time you own your home.

And, shopping around might save you angst, too. J.D. Power’s Mortgage Origination Satisfaction Study found that customers who received two or more quotes were more satisfied than those who settled on the first one they received.

 

Home Buyer Budget-Busting Mistake 5: Not using a real estate agent.

 

Think that it’s too expensive to use the services of a professional real estate agent? Think again! That’s because some first time home buyers don’t realize that it’s the seller who pays the real estate commissions. And as a buyer, you need to remember that the seller’s agent is “working” for them. That’s why it’s smart to have your own counsel to help negotiate the home price in your favor. After all, it’s free, so why not use a trained professional who can help you make the most of your home-buying budget?

 

Home Buyer Budget-Busting Mistake 6: Not considering location logistics.

 

“Location, location, location” is an old adage in real estate, which means that where you buy is at least as important as what you buy. And that can certainly be true throughout the process. Hot neighborhoods (and yes, those school districts again!) can spark increased resale value, but it’s also important to think through your lifestyle and what you and your partner or family needs.

For example, if you buy a home that’s not near mass transit, you might end up racking up whopping bills on commuting costs, from gas to parking. Or, if all your child’s favored activities are a long ways away, you might end up becoming the definition of a Mom Taxi – and the car wear and tear that accompanies it. Finally, if you’re used to doing errands on foot, you’ll want to make sure your new location is pedestrian friendly. (You can check the “Walk Score” of your area here.)

With a little advance planning, you can make sure that the biggest purchase of your life is also the wisest.