7 ways to keep employee benefits top of mind

HR works hard to find the best benefits program for employees and then communicate the “benefits of the benefits,” so to speak. But sometimes, even with the best of intentions, the information falls on deaf ears – or blind eyes. In fact, one recent study found that less than half of employees know what benefits are available to them, and yet nearly the same percentage said they would consider leaving their current job because the benefits are inadequate.

That means that HR has a job to do to keep their benefit offerings fresh in employees’ minds.

Follow up shortly after onboarding.

The first day can be a whirlwind for employees who are meeting new faces and receiving a barrage of information from everyone from their manager to, yes, the HR team. But think about it – new people who don’t even yet know where the copy machine is probably aren’t paying as much attention as they should to the benefits package, especially lesser-known programs like disability insurance. Naturally there is some paperwork they have to sign right away, but after that, give them a couple of weeks to settle in and then resume the benefits discussion. They might be much more tuned in once they’ve figured out the basics of their job.

Upgrade your website.

No longer do you have to depend on explaining your benefits program via a sheaf of papers that employees stow in their desks, never to see again. Chances are good your website probably already has the information, but is it easy to access and intuitive? The interface should be easy to read so that employees can visit and find what they need without endless scrolling or clicking. Consider talking to a web designer – either in-house or a contractor – who can help you design your website with marketing best practices in mind. After all, marketing your benefits (and by extension, your company) is exactly what you’re doing.

Present information in different ways.

Some of us love to read. Some of us love in-person presentations. Younger generations like millennials are all about the visuals. So even though it might entail a little extra work, commit to creating your materials in several different formats so you are bound to reach employees in the way that works for them. This strategy even has a great name – COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere).

Use multi-channel options.

In addition to different formats, you’ll want to distribute the information using different channels. A short text might remind employees that open enrollment is coming up. An email can provide detailed links to a wide variety of benefits. Your social media platforms can show some of your more “fun” benefits being used, such as employees taking a noontime walk as part of your wellness initiative or a group enjoying a team-building activity. Not only will social media remind employees of what’s available, but it also paints your company positively to others who are following your channels.

Ask for feedback.

Wondering what employees think of your benefits? A survey is an ideal way to get feedback with suggestions that can help you fine-tune your offerings, and it can identify what benefits employees don’t know about yet so you can determine where more communication is needed. It also allows you to raise awareness of some lesser-known programs; employees might not even realize how many programs you offer until they read about them on the survey.

Set up a hotline.

Have a dedicated number that employees can call if they have questions (and make sure someone returns the calls diligently if they leave a message). Call attention to the number by playing a game and awarding a $5 coffee card to any employee who knows the number when you ask them.

Pay them to learn more.

What? Why would you do that? Well, because it works, found Pierre-Renaud Tremblay, director of human resources for steam cleaning products company Dupray. Dismayed by a dismal 12 percent open rate on his emails, he upped the ante by developing online quizzes covering the material from the emails, offering gift certificates for employees who scored well, Forbes reports. He found his email open rate skyrocket to up to 95 percent.

And if more information about benefits helps satisfy employees, which contributes to retention, it will be money well spent.